No-knead bread – 3 varieties

We haven’t bought a loaf of bread for many months now. Ever since we discovered how much the boys (and we) love the taste of a fresh homemade loaf, and how easy it is to bake your own bread, we just have not seen the point in buying from the local supermarket. When making it ourselves, we know exactly what is inside the bread too. And they actually seem to stay fresh longer compared to many store bought loaves.

Fresh bread with brown cheese (so extremely Norwegian)

Fresh bread with brown cheese (so extremely Norwegian)

No-knead or kneadfree bread is characterized by it’s long fermentation (proving) time, using very little yeast to form the gluten strands. This is instead of a normal bread where you knead well to form the gluten strands in the dough. Because this way of making bread is so simple, it has become a very popular method of baking. You’ll find plenty of blogs, books and social media accounts dedicated to this baking method. Personally, I switch a little between this method and normal kneaded bread. Using limited amounts of yeast, ensuring a natural fermentation also makes the bread easier to digest.

In this post, I will give you the recipe for 3 types of no-knead bread that you can make ahead in the evening and finish the following morning.

Number 1:
350 grams normal wheat flour
150 grams whole wheat
100 grams flaxseed and sunflower seeds.
1 tsp salt
1/2 tsp dry yeast
400 ml water

Number 2:
350 grams normal wheat flour
75 grams rye flour
75 grams whole spelt flour
50 grams chopped pecan nuts
1 tbsp honey
1 tsp salt
1/2 tsp dry yeast
400 ml water

Number 3:
(I used some leftovers, which is the reason for similar flour mentioned twice)
350 grams normal wheat flour
100 grams rye/ whole wheat mix
50 grams whole wheat
50 grams quinoa flakes
100 grams chopped almonds and walnuts
1 tbsp honey
1 tsp salt
1/2 tsp dry yeast
450 ml water

Ingredients for a no-knead bread

Ingredients for a no-knead bread

Mix all the ingredients well and cover the bowl with clingfilm to prove over night.

The 3 different dough's

The 3 different dough’s

To shape, cover the baking surface in flour. Use some additional flour on the dough. Stretch and fold 8-10 times to shape into a flat ball.

Stretching and folding of the dough

Stretching and folding of the dough

Do the second proving in a proving basket or cloth covered with flour.
Preheat a cast iron pot with lid to 250 degrees Celsius. Fold the dough into the hot pot. Cook at 250 degrees with a lid for 30 minutes. Turn down to 200 degrees and take the lid off. Cook for another 15 minutes to get a crisp finish. Cool on a rack and enjoy.

Three finished loaves

Three finished loaves

Tip:
Make sure to check that the handle/knob on your pots lid can handle the temperature.

Folding the risen dough into the warm pot can be somewhat of a challenge. It often ends up a little lopsided, but honestly, that just adds to the charm! 🙂

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